Week 7 – 18th February

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This week has been a definite learning experience. My inclination has become that I should watch more films I haven’t seen before. As much as I enjoy a good film on repeat viewings, this project is partly about expanding my experience.

Sadly trying to watch new films has meant I’ve watched some real dross this week. It might just be happenstance that I’ve picked bad films when I’ve seen the blurb, but I was aiming for films that I had some sort of passing interest in – a movie of a beloved series, an actor or writer I liked, that kind of thing. I’m afraid this week is going to be more negative than normal because there are some really not good films watched!

So I’m going to try to go for a slightly more curated effort in future. I’ve added to my watchlist on Amazon (and Letterboxd) so that I can have films available more readily. The downside is that the films are likely to be more intense and need more attention, so I won’t be able to have them on in the background. There’s probably a happy medium, maybe 2018 will help me find it.

Absolutely Fabulous: the Movie

And starting off with a film that wasn’t just bad, it would have been bad had they made it at the time the series was popular. But that was 20-25 years ago, so this film was incredibly out of place. What moments of good comedy existed were too sporadic to be noteworthy.

The Cable Guy

This is the only film I had seen before this week. After hearing it discussed on the Movie Crush podcast I wanted to give it another go, having not enjoyed it previously. Like Crouching Tiger and Rogue One, it hasn’t improved.

Violet & Daisy

Young female assassins, and James Gandolfini, in a dark comedy. But there was little humour, the plot barely held together, and it was too scatter gun with the world it was trying to create.

The Rock

I watched this for Pop Culturally Deprived and expected to enjoy it. But this is not a good film. It takes itself way too seriously, doesn’t get the best from its leading actors, and takes half the film to get to what should have been the main point of it all. Fuller thoughts on the podcast, as we did have a really good and in depth discussion about it.

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates

Anna Kendrick and Aubrey Plaza go a very long way with me. But this twist lacks the charm of Wedding Crashers, going for gross, violent, or loud humour wherever possible. A few moments are rescued by some good performances, but largely those are shouted offscreen by an ensemble that do not give each other room to perform.

Plastic Galaxy: The Story of Star Wars Toys

For a lot of this documentary it does exactly what I’d like it to do – give an insight into the companies that developed Star Wars toys, show us the very rare items, and demonstrate what was done to aid the longevity of the series. But there was also an element of ogling the very nerdy guys who collected them, reminiscent of the way Trekkies almost shamed some of its subjects by finding the ‘most extreme’. What could have been a celebration at times turned cringe-worthy.

Little Evil

Adam Scott dealing with a step-son that might be the devil sounds like a good setup. But this film did very little that we’ve not seen elsewhere, Scott himself didn’t get much to do other than react. Evangaline Lily was as good as ever at least.

Baywatch

Knowing that I’ve watched some bad films this week, you might expect this to be on that side of things. I did. But I was utterly surprised. For the most part this film knew exactly what it was doing, made fun of itself, and had characters that were treated better than you might expect (generally). At times I got the impression the movie didn’t quite know what to do with itself, particularly in the last third where it forgot to do comedy and just dealt with the plot, but other than that I had a lot of fun watching it.

Hidden Figures

Fortunately the week as a whole was rescued by a superb film. I was interested in seeing Hidden Figures from the first time I heard about it, and was not let down. The tale is well told, and points where I expected terrible things to happen generally surprised me. Reading up on it afterwards I’m a little disappointed how much was changed to add drama, but that is often the way of things.

Recommendation

Easily this is Hidden Figures – some terrific performances and a story that is just a snippet in a much larger piece, but I enjoyed it from beginning to end.

Week 6 – 11th February

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I spent some time in the last week logging films in Letterboxd that I’d seen before 2018. So far I’m up to about 1100. The main reason was to fill out some of the notable lists they advertise, but in doing so I’ve noticed a number of significant movies or pop culture items that I think I’d be expected to watch. Films like Citizen Kane, Rashomon, and Vertigo that I know because of their importance and the number of references to them, but have never seen. I’d like to see them, so I think that will be another way to fill out the 365 films this year.

There are pop culture films that are ‘must see’ but I’m not planning on watching. Singing in the Rain, The Sound of Music, and Shakespeare in Love are films I probably should see, but for one reason or another I find myself lacking the desire to do so. Maybe eventually.

And I’ve noticed this week I’ve seen a number of films with punctuation in the titles. I don’t think it means anything, it just feels like an oddity.

The Cloverfield Paradox

What a treat to wake up on a Monday morning and find a new movie available to watch that hasn’t even been advertised before, and in a genre I’m very fond of. The anthology structure of Cloverfield films is a really interesting take, and I feel like I can’t judge it too much until we’ve had a lot more understanding of what’s going on. So taking this film on its own merits… it’s only okay. There are some interesting things but I’d recommend something like Event Horizon before this. I’m not even sure this is going to be useful as a reference to the wider Cloverfield pieces other than a note about their origin.

War Dogs

I was recommended to this by my friend Dave. The trailer had looked interesting but a little Jonah Hill goes a long way, so I wasn’t sure. I’m glad I did watch it – the story was incredibly well told, with some terrific moments and a good insight into the world of FedBizOpps.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

My reaction when this came out was somewhat muted, I was prepared to love something new in the Star Wars universe and ultimately felt let down by a not great movie. I wanted to watch it again to see if my feelings changed or I could react differently, but sadly not. The film introduces too many new characters and locations too quickly and with not enough detail on motivations and relationships. Some of the plotting of the set pieces is baffling (why do they need to be told the location of the data file and use arms to get it out then take it to another location to transmit it?), as is the use of the Death Star. Probably this means Star Wars films are no longer made for someone like me to enjoy as a one off experience, but for people who want to read info about characters online, see the snippets and other small details on action figures, video games etc.

Power Rangers

Another recommendation, this from Caitlin on Twitter (@caitlingss), having discussed an enjoyment of large mecha and family of choice for Pacific Rim a while back. I was surprised how much I enjoyed the film. It’s not doing anything particularly unexpected, but part of that stems from younger viewers being the target audience for this, so they won’t have the experience with action films of this type. The fights were good, the team bonding was well done, and Elizabeth Banks clearly relishing her opportunity to ham it up as the villain.

Oh Lucy!

I actually saw this at a cinema, as part of the Japan Foundation’s film series in London. What I had expected from the title and blurb was a quirky comedy about a Japanese woman following her English teacher to the USA. What I got was something very dark and almost told with the intention of giving the saddest ending possible. There is probably a lot of truth in the stories told of the titular Lucy, her family, and the other characters, but definitely the film is mistitled at the very least. As much as there was a lot to discuss on our journey home, I find myself unable to recommend this film as it’s so bleak and with no characters to support or root for.

I, Tonya

Another cinema trip, I got a free ticket to a preview as part of the Sky VIP programme. And wow was this a good film. The way the story was built up as it went on was so clever, working towards ‘the incident’ and laying the groundwork for what is to come through the early movements. But more than that the performances were incredible – I’m a big fan of Allison Janney anyway, and Sebastian Stan almost disappeared entirely in his role – and the way the movie was shot and delivered was magnificent. The cinematography through the skating routines was just sublime and felt personal, really in Tonya’s POV, but the way we had interviews, fourth wall breaks, contradicting descriptions, and sequences showing the passage of time just blew me away.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Like with Rogue One, I wanted to watch this to gauge my feelings. When I first saw this film it was on a wave of excess hype and high critical praise. I was sad that I didn’t enjoy it as much as everyone else seemed to, so I wondered if I could appreciate it more now. But I’m still sad. The sequences of action and chasing are exquisite, and beautifully moving with a score that changes the way the images are presented. I really enjoy the drama between some of the characters (Michelle Yeoh and Chow Yun Fat in particular), but largely everything else in between them leaves me cold.

Captain Fantastic

Another film I wanted to watch because of critical acclaim. An interesting film, with some good content worthy of discussion and analysis, it seems to be the idea of what if one parenting technique was taken to absolute extremes. There was enough in here that was joyful and heartwarming to make it an enjoyable watch, if somewhat difficult and at times on the cusp of being shocking.

Citizen Kane

As I said before, this was a film I hadn’t seen but was incredibly familiar with, to the extent I knew the reveal of rosebud from an episode of Columbo. Still, sometimes you need to see the origin of something, and this did not disappoint. The style of the film, its combining of genre and technique, as well as the way the central character never actually performs in the story we’re being told in the ‘now’ of the film all delighted me. It’s an incredibly confident piece, which deserves its place in the history of cinema. If I’d come to this before other films I consider favourites (2001, The Godfather) Citizen Kane might be the one I rave about.

Spotlight

I had wanted to watch Spotlight for a while but not had the time to give it proper attention. I’m glad I waited until I could, since the film is so engaging and really benefits from seeing how the story is developed. I had to keep reminding myself it was based on a true story, as I was expecting more revelations or obstacles as it went on. The true strength here is showing how low key everyone, including initially the Spotlight team, treated the allegations and potential cover up until they saw the ramifications. A tremendous watch and deserving of the plaudits it got.

Recommendation

We have a really tricky situation for recommendation this week. On the one hand, Citizen Kane – potentially the greatest film ever made, the spark from which most other great films draw inspiration in some form, but something everyone knows really well. On the other hand, I, Tonya – a newer film that I want to recommend to make sure everyone sees it and can relish the quality of the performances and the production.

I think I have to go I, Tonya, because I want everyone to know it should be seen. I might even go see it a second time because of how much I enjoyed it, and that’s pretty much the best recommendation I can give.

Week 5 – 4th February

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Back up to a high number of films this week, 10 in total. I think I learned the lesson I have been given time and time again – trust your instinct. When I’ve heard of a film and decided not to watch it because it doesn’t look that good, I’m usually right. When I hear of a film and decide to watch it, I’m often pleasantly surprised.

This is not a hard and fast rule, and is probably counteracted by learning too much about a film and spoiling it, or being more prepared to like something when I think about it less.

Which is pretty much why I avoid trailers and other information for films I want to see. Which is a complete switch from where it used to be – Attack of the Clones and Star Trek Nemesis I’d actually read the script before seeing them. But at some point you realise that sort of insight can ruin the enjoyment rather than heighten the expectation.

The World’s End

I enjoyed Shaun of the Dead, much more so on TV than in the cinema. Hot Fuzz I love anywhere, it’s a great take on small village living with a fun twist. Whilst this tries the same thing it fails because so little time is given to the village, so much time is given to the leads who are either awful or uninteresting, and the twist is poorly conceived and delivered. So I should have trusted my instinct that has stopped me from watching it until now.

Operator

Another film I was recommended to by Netflix based on previous content. A socially awkward man uses his wife’s voice and personality to create a digital assistant for a healthcare company, and the lines between which he cares more for become unclear, impacting their relationship. This film is everything I wanted Her to be, a good use of technology to tell a human story. There is not a person in this film I didn’t care about, and I was thoroughly engaged by the story. A really good watch.

Killing Reagan

Letterboxd lists this as the ‘most obscure’ film I’ve watched so far. I wanted to see it after hearing the actor Tim Matheson, who plays Reagan on The West Wing Weekly podcast. It’s a nice telling of the event and the personalities involved, but a little lacking in drama, which is often hard with a historically truthful tale.

Burying The Ex

Truth be told I was only watching this because it has Anton Yelchin in it. Sadly that wasn’t enough to rescue a very ordinary film that has a really nice idea at the core of it, but doesn’t make it work. Reminiscent of the movie ‘Life After Beth’ in many many ways, but at least that had Anna Kendrick and Aubrey Plaza to shore it up.

The Thomas Crown Affair (remake)

You can hear my thoughts on this in detail on a future Pop Culturally Deprived, but this is still a good heist movie that uses its lead actors very very well and has an incredibly sharp script behind it.

The Thomas Crown Affair (original)

Which is to say that the writing on the original is less good. The leads are excellent but this is clearly a film of its time – the number of changes that they made for the 1999 film shows how this wasn’t quite as good as it wanted to be.

Ghost In The Shell (Live-action remake)

I love the original GITS (and will be watching that soon), and was very excited to see this when it was announced. As it got closer to release I was less and less enthused by it, so ended up not catching this at the cinema. Again, good instincts because it was lacking in a number of ways. They tried to use the live action nature in some ways that don’t work as well in animation (showing emotion, doing a more personal element of the story), but they kept in all the set pieces which were much better in the original. It left me questioning really why this was made.

Death Note (2017)

I have to admit I do not know Death Note other than by the references I see on t-shirts, comics, merchandise etc. Netflix offered me the trailer and I was grabbed within a few seconds. Again, my instinct paid off. I was riveted by the whole thing. The idea is good, the implementation is good, the escalation is good. There’s a lot about this to enjoy, and it might be the best thing I’ve seen so far.

Now You See Me

My instinct on this was to not see it at the cinema, but that it would be enjoyable when I did catch it. And that was on point up to the last 10 minutes. The whole way through we felt like the movie was lying to us, or holding something back, and when it came it was almost flippantly given away in a manner that actually lessened the whole. This is definitely a film that goes for style over substance, and doesn’t show you the best bits of the story (the development of the illusions, the magicians together).

Now You See Me 2

Fortunately the sequel does give you those things. Unfortunately it likes style even more than the first. There’s a sequence in here where they’re flipping a card between them whilst being frisked. It looks great. It has no purpose. I genuinely do not understand why they did that. And a lot of the tricks shown were much more about CG and visual effects than they were genuine magic tricks. I enjoyed this more than the first because we spent more time with the magicians at its core, but still not really impressed.

Recommendation

I would love to recommend Death Note as I enjoyed it so much, but reading the critical reception I think I’m on the wrong side of that one (my lack of knowledge of the source material is probably to blame). Operator however was a terrific film that told an excellent story in a gripping manner, so everyone should definitely seek that out.

Matthew’s Movie Mentions – Week 4 28th January

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I said I wanted to watch an ‘ordinary’ amount of films, and I think I achieved that this week.

It might be worth covering my film library mechanisms, so I can refer back to it if needed. I have four main sources for films – Netflix, Amazon Prime, Sky Cinema, and my DVD collection. These are all sources that are effectively instant access. When I know I have to or want to watch something that I don’t own I tend to search the others on a PC or on my phone, and add to the watch list on the relevant service. Very occasionally a film is on a regular TV channel but that sort of happenstance is rare.

Where a film isn’t available from these I turn to my secondary sources – charity shops, CEX, and digital rental. There are a number of charity shops that sell secondhand DVDs in the village I live in, so every so often I wander up one side of the high street and back down the other to seek something out. CEX is a UK secondhand trade in shop that quite often has things very cheap after they’ve been out a couple of years. In terms of digital rental I tend to use Amazon Video or Google Play.

And every so often I actually go to the cinema to watch a film. The next town over has an Odeon cinema which is actually quite nice. There’s an independent cinema in the town my family live in, and a Cineworld nearby that. I used to go to Picturehouse Clapham or Ritzy Brixton, and for special occasions I visit the Electric Cinema in Portobello Road, which is pretty much the best cinema I’ve ever been to.

Secret Origin: The Story of DC Comics

I watched this because the DVD of it came free with Batman: Assault on Arkham. It was an okay documentary, narrated by Ryan Reynolds (which must mean it was made around the release of Green Lantern). The insight into the actual creators of the original heroes and DC itself was really good, but when it got into the histories of the characters it was going over information most would know so it felt a little aimless.

The Nice Guys

I enjoy a good noir story, and when Nice Guys tried to do that it worked really well. The odd couple style pairing really did work, and both characters were well crafted. However they also tried to make this funny, but often by delivering an unusual juxtaposition between the situation and the reaction. At those times it worked less well. I could easily see this film having a follow-up which I’d be interested to check out.

The Circle

Netflix recommended this to me because of a previous film, and the stellar cast lured me in to watch it. I recommend anyone else similarly tempted to trust their instinct that questions why they’ve not heard of a film with Tom Hanks, Patton Oswald, Emma Watson, John Boyega (and others). It wanted to be a mysterious tale of a dark possible future, but it never really embraced the darkness or where the plot could go, just looking at it in potentia without delivering. Black Mirror does this better, go watch that instead.

The Incredibles

We’re covering this on PCD, and I’m always happy to watch The Incredibles. Whilst it’s a superhero film which is still such a major genre, it’s stylistically, narratively, and generally done in a more capable fashion than most others.

Get Out

I will admit I have owned this for several months since Sky gave me a free purchase from their store. I was very keen to receive it but then it took an age to come and I never made time once I had it. But that is my error – this is a really good film. Very cleverly creating a sense of tension and oddness to the events, with incredibly confident performances from every member of its cast.

Constantine

We watched this for ATAV so you can check out that podcast now if you want. I loved this film when it came out, which explains why I own it, and

Recommendation

As good as The Incredibles is, I think Get Out might be my recommendation just for something a bit different and with a perspective that works so fully throughout.

Week 3 – 21st January

This week Matthew has watched:

The Magnificent Seven (Remake)
Life
The Stanford Prison Experiment
Pacific Rim
Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them
Bill
The Emperor’s New Groove
Godzilla: Final Wars
Supergirl
Colossal

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Matthew’s Movie Mentions – Week 3 21st January

Much more to discuss this week which is good, and hopefully I’m now into the flow of watching films regularly.

The Magnificent Seven (remake)

I saw the original of this years ago at university, enjoying it at the time, but Westerns aren’t something I go back to once seen. This remake was what I wanted it to be – on in the background and enjoyable enough. It probably wasn’t necessary but at the very least it did do some work in updating and embracing modern storytelling and production rather than a straight remake.

Life

This was on my list of films to watch at the cinema but I missed it. This probably would have been more engrossing in the cinema environment, it’s a solid claustrophobic horror, but doesn’t particularly do anything that we’ve not seen in Alien, Gravity, Event Horizon, or other films of this ilk. The ‘lifeform’ was very well realised, both visually and in behaviour, and tension was ramped up without being gory so that’s something.

The Stanford Prison Experiment

Since enjoying Ezra Miller so much in Justice League I’m watching more of his films. We spent a bit of time on this experiment at university so it was interesting seeing a dramatised version of it, but I feel a better version of this film might be possible where it moralises more, or gives more insight into it. Maybe a mix of insight from professionals and dramatising some events might work well.

Pacific Rim

I was about 30 minutes into this film when I decided I wanted to watch it again with my partner. This is such a terrific film, and parts of it are exactly designed to delight her. We watched it at the cinema on release but hadn’t seen it since, and it is still a terrific movie. Probably the best I’ve watched this year so far, and I can’t wait to talk about it on Pop Culturally Deprived.

Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them

Honestly this took me about four sittings to get through. I wasn’t inspired to watch it but felt I should, and even in getting through it I found it hard to get into the story or characters. In the end I didn’t find anything too surprising or involving, and the main character is almost secondary to the story they seem to be pinning the coming series on.

Bill

The first recommendation that I’ve watched comes from @katyshuroo on Twitter. My childhood being taken to castles, homes, and other historical sites means I don’t go to films with a historical setting very often. This was actually pretty funny, some very good wordplay throughout and actors who were really into their parts without, generally, camping it up à la Monty Python.

The Emperor’s New Groove

Admittedly I only watched this because when I turned off Bill it was just starting on TV. One of my favourite Disney films, it’s a great example of slightly weird Disney – drawing from the TV cartoon series that had been so popular in the 90’s to create a similar vibe, alongside some really well defined characters who all have a terrific arc.

Godzilla: Final Wars

I’d been meaning to watch this for a long while now, and decided that building up to discussing Pacific Rim was a good time. I’m perhaps over-hyped on this since I enjoyed it less than expected. The second half was what I expected the whole film to be, and the first half was just a mishmash of ideas that didn’t come together as well as they hoped.

Supergirl

Wow this is even worse than I remembered it being. Check out our latest Across The Arrow-Verse where we spend 18 minutes trying to find things to discuss. Just don’t watch this film.

Colossal

Again tying into Pacific Rim is a rewatch of one of my favourite recent films. Anne Hathaway is sublime in a darkly flawed character who goes from one bad relationship to another, at the same time there are monster attacks in Seoul. I actually think I enjoyed this more the second time when I could pay more attention to the performances and characters.

Recommendation of the week

As much as Pacific Rim and Emperor’s New Groove are truly great films, I want to recommend Colossal because it has not yet been seen by enough people. You won’t be sorry you spent time with that film.

Matthew’s Movie Mentions – Week 2 14th January

A much shorter list of films this week, mostly because the last episode included some of this week’s films (and Brooklyn Nine Nine was back on Netflix).

Groundhog Day

Still a really good film. A more critical look at it makes it more interesting, although there are some problematic elements that stand out really starkly these days. I’m looking forward to our episode on this coming out, it’s a terrific discussion that gets into the detail of the film.

The One I Love

In all honesty I started this last year, but only finished it because I was consistently annoyed at Netflix having it as something to continue watching. I’m not sure if I’m glad that I did, but the film definitely ended up as something different than I expected, but it’s not a happy film and really rambles at times.

Batman: Assault on Arkham

This is still really fun, and possibly better than the Suicide Squad movie. It was interesting watching with someone not as into the animated movies or the characters as much, it did show up how much is standard stuff that isn’t really interesting. I’d recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good heist and/or the DC Universe.

Recommendation

Groundhog Day holds up well, and I’d recommend watching it ahead of the Pop Culturally Deprived episode at the end of January.

 

Matthew’s Movie Mentions – Week 1 9th January

(You can hear the audio version of this post by downloading this podcast)

These will not be full reviews.

These will not be full reviews.

These will not be full reviews.

I need to keep repeating that to remember it. The aim of this is to record some notes on the films I watch during 2018, and to recommend anything I think deserves it.

With that said (also these will not be full reviews)…

Cars 2

I watched this when friends were staying and it entranced their son. The problem is I can’t help but compare it to the first Cars, and now Cars 3. This sequel has way too little racing in it, and tries to be more of an adventure. The problem is it’s the racing in the other films that makes them quality. Clearly good fun for a child though.

Kong: Skull Island

Really enjoyable action romp, reminiscent of Deep Blue Sea in how it doesn’t take itself seriously. A little heavy handed how they’re using it to create another movie universe (everyone wants their mega-franchise), but I’m here for the follow ups.

John Wick: Chapter 2

Well, they basically made the first with more of a look at the world they created. Which is nice because it was the world that made the first so interesting, but it was the action and unique visual style that made it great. That felt lost in this, often repeating some of the set pieces and moments but losing something in the process. I’ll watch the third, but the first is still all you need.

Jobs

I really enjoyed the Fassbender/Sorkin Steve Jobs movie, but felt like I wanted more of his story, so this would be the perfect film. But this is lesser – he is not as smart, driven, or likeable in this. Ashton Kutcher does some good stuff, but it feels more of an impression than a character. I’m still feeling like it’s missing some of the later years developing the i-products, so maybe I need to find a book to really get the full story.

Table 19

Wow Anna Kendrick is busy. She’s always watchable, but this really seemed to be a first screenplay with not a huge amount of nuance or depth. There were some good moments and some really good performances, but all in all it was pretty forgettable.

Don’t Think Twice

Quite often there are comedies that are aimed at comedy writers. This felt like one of those – people who do improv and live the NY comedy life might really enjoy this. The problem is the comedy was not funny enough, which might have been the point that the improv group were only okay.

Mascots

Wow this was not funny. Slightly sentimental, but in all it was largely either obvious or poor.

Wet Hot American Summer

I knew of this because of its cult status, but nothing else. The best description I can give this is that it’s a Monty Python-esque take on the camp experience. Some really interesting elements showing the evolution of humour from things like Animal House, alongside some great examples of surreal takes on personality and situation. I’m not sure it’s good enough to be recommended, but I’m glad I finally saw it.

Charlie’s Angels

This film is exactly what I’ve always wanted the Mission Impossible films to be – lots of capers, interesting set ups where they have to do crazy shenanigans. An all star cast (seriously!), plus some fun. It overdoes the sexy sexy stuff too much, lots of gratuitous bending over, outfits, and situations. But the cinematography is surprisingly solid (the dolly zoom on the race cars? The single take at the turn?) and it boasts great performances.

After Porn Ends 2

The first film was surprisingly interesting with some ordinary examples of people moving on after their careers in the adult film industry, some remaining in the industry in some capacity, and some hard stories. This sequel seemed to have more people who continued in the industry, made career come-backs, or had greater success somewhere. Still interesting though.

Snippets (films I watched parts of)

Spider-Man 2 – Really does not hold up. Poor dialogue, average action, and I still don’t like Kirsten Dunst as MJ.

GOTG2 – This would be really good without the Drax stuff, it’s annoying and fully detracts from the rest of the film. Oh and if anything that happened mattered in the universe they’ve created.

Recommendation of the week

It’s got to be Kong: Skull Island. Overall it was pretty enjoyable, if not wonderful, and there is a good chance elements from this will be brought into future films – although I’m certain they won’t make it a necessity to have seen this film!

Week 1 – 9th January

Kicking off the 365 films in 2018 with a bang, Matthew has watched:

Cars 2
Kong: Skull Island
John Wick: Chapter 2
Jobs
Table 19
Don’t Think Twice
Mascots
Wet Hot American Summer
Charlies Angels
After Porn Ends 2

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